Where the University gets its income

More than half of our income comes from tuition fees. The rest comes from other sources, including:

  • grants from funding bodies
  • the UK government
  • donations and investments
  • our accommodation and catering services

What your fees pay for

Whether you have Home or Overseas fee status, your tuition fees pay for core costs, including:

  • academic and research staff
  • student services, including wellbeing support and counselling in multiple languages
  • support systems for teaching, research, and other activities, including services and support which are particularly relevant for international students
  • IT facilities
  • the Library
  • work placements and study abroad
  • financial support (bursaries)
  • teaching support
  • sports and arts facilities
  • estates and facilities
  • utility costs like maintenance, heating, and cleaning
  • repaying loans for new buildings

Breakdown of University expenditure

These tables and pie charts show the percentages of undergraduate and taught postgraduate tuition fees we spent on core costs during the 2020/21 academic year.

How we spent undergraduate tuition fees1

A pie chart showing how undergraduate tuition fees are spent.

Spending area % of fees spent
Direct teaching costs (including academic staff, technicians, and non-pay teaching resources) 38.1
Premises and general teaching areas 18.8
Academic services (including faculty support teams, Centre for Learning and Teaching, Academic Skills Centre, and Careers Service) 8.3
Administrative support (including the Management Team and structures, Human Resources, Finance, and Admissions) 6.8
Computing services 6.4
Outreach and communication 4.5
Sport 3.4
Other (including alumni, student recruitment costs, and technical adjustments for the pension) 3.2
The Library 3.0
Scholarships and bursaries 2.8
Student welfare 2.2
Students' Union 1.6
The Edge and the arts 0.9
Total 100

How we spent taught postgraduate tuition fees2

A pie chart showing how taught postgraduate tuition fees are spent.

Spending area % of fees spent
Direct teaching costs (including academic staff, technicians, and non-pay teaching resources) 50.6
Premises and general teaching areas 12.0
Other (including alumni, student recruitment costs, and technical adjustments for the pension) 9.9
Academic services (including faculty support teams, Centre for Learning and Teaching, Academic Skills Centre, and Careers Service) 8.4
Administrative support (including the Management Team and structures, Human Resources, Finance, and Admissions) 5.1
Computing services 4.3
Sport 2.3
The Library 2.0
Student welfare 1.5
Outreach and communication 1.1
Students' Union 1.1
Scholarships and bursaries 1.1
The Edge and the arts 0.6
Total 100

Giving you value for money

By choosing to study here, you're making significant financial and time commitments to the University. In return, we're committed to making sure you receive value for money.

How we give you value for money

We give you value for money by providing:

  • opportunities and resources to develop the academic and professional skills, expertise, and experience you need for both professional practice and research
  • a student experience that draws together academic, pastoral, social, and extracurricular opportunities, with access to excellent facilities and supportive staff
  • access to placement opportunities through our longstanding employer relationships, helping you develop personal and professional experience and networks
  • support from our global alumni network through mentoring, placement opportunities, and studentships, as well as the chance to join the network when you graduate
  • careers support throughout your degree and your working life

You can see the value of these activities through:

How we get value for money

We're committed to getting good value for the money we spend on services and supplies.

We do this through our:

Why Home fees are lower than Overseas fees

If you're an undergraduate student with Home fee status, your tuition fees are regulated by the UK government. If you're an Overseas or postgraduate student, your tuition fees are set by the University.

The income we get from undergraduate students with Home fee status doesn't cover all the costs of running the University or carrying out the research that informs our teaching and helps build our reputation. While tuition fees paid by Home students contribute to these running costs, universities like Bath also depend on funding from other sources. This includes funding from the UK government using taxpayer money, for example, in the form of research grants and other types of investment. This funding helps the UK higher education sector maintain its global reputation for research and teaching excellence.

The UK government also allows universities to earn income from other sources, including tuition fees paid by Overseas students. These fees are set by universities themselves, taking account of market conditions and other factors, including the costs of providing research and education facilities, teaching, and support.

Tuition fees are liable to increase annually for all University of Bath students. We advise all Overseas and postgraduate students to budget for an increase of up to 5% each year for every further year of study; we won't increase your fees each year by more than this percentage and the amount will be set out on our fees pages in December for the following academic year.

In common with many other countries, the way the UK higher education sector is funded assumes that, as an undergraduate student with Home fee status, you're likely to pay taxes in the UK after you graduate. This means you'll contribute to the funding of the UK higher education system through your taxes as well as through the fees you pay while studying. As a taxpayer in the UK, you'll also subsidise the cost of the student finance system, which provides loans to undergraduate and postgraduate students. The government expects that 25% of current full-time undergraduates who take out loans will repay them in full.3

One way to understand the difference between Home and Overseas fees is that, although many students with Overseas fee status do choose to work and pay taxes in the UK, as an Overseas student you're less likely to do this than a Home student. As a result, your financial contribution to the UK in taxes will be less throughout your life. For this reason, as a student with Overseas fee status, you're asked to pay more for the provision of your education through your tuition fees.

Investment and improvements for the future

As a charity, we don't have any shareholders or owners. This means any surplus income (money left over after everything is paid for) is invested back into the University for improvements to our campus facilities and services.

Footnotes

1 The undergraduate percentage breakdown is based on the total tuition fees received from Home and Overseas undergraduate students, supplemented by recurrent grant income administered by the Office for Students to support, among other things, the teaching of high-cost STEM subjects, the Turing Scheme, overseas study programmes, and premiums to support successful student outcomes.

2 The taught postgraduate percentage breakdown is based on the total tuition fees received from Home and Overseas taught postgraduate students. It doesn't include tuition fees received from postgraduate research students or show expenditure on research activities.

3 According to the government's review of student loan statistics.